Tea for Teaching

Informal discussions of effective practices in teaching and learning.

Flipping the classroom

Flipping the classroom is one way to dedicate class time to active learning. In theory it sounds great, but how do you flip a classroom without flopping? In this episode, Dr. Dominick Casadonte, a Chemistry Professor at Texas Tech University, joins us to discuss research and best practices related to flipped classrooms.

A transcript of this episode and show notes may be found at http://teaforteaching.com.

Peer instruction

Imagine a scenario where students retain knowledge effectively and are active and engaged participants who are self-aware of what they know (and don’t know). Did you picture a lecture class, students taking a test, or students writing? In this episode, John discusses three ways in which he has been using peer-instruction in his classes: classroom polling, calibrated peer review writing assignments, and two-stage exams.

A transcript of this episode and show notes may be found at http://teaforteaching.com.

Teaching big

You might think you have a heavy course load. Imagine being the instructor of record for approximately 5,000 students in a semester. In this episode, Dr. Kristina Mitchell, a faculty member and director of the online education program for the Political Science Department at Texas Tech, joins us again to discuss the design, organization, and management of high-enrollment online introductory political science courses.

A transcript of this episode and show notes may be found at http://teaforteaching.com.

 

Gender Bias in Course Evaluations

Have you ever received comments in student evaluations that focus on your appearance, your personality, or competence? Do students refer to you as teacher or an inappropriate title, like Mr. or Mrs., rather than professor? For some, this may sound all too familiar. Kristina Mitchell, a Political Science Professor from Texas Tech University, joins us in this episode to discuss her research exploring gender bias in student course evaluations.

A transcript of this episode and show notes may be found at http://teaforteaching.com.

Mobile Technology in the Classroom

Smartphones, laptops and tablets can be useful learning tools in the classroom; they can also be a source of distraction. In this episode, we discuss alternative policies that faculty and students might adopt to facilitate learning. Recent research on the relative effectiveness of handwritten vs. digital notetaking is also examined.

A transcript of this episode and show notes may be found at: http://teaforteaching.com

Evidence-based teaching in large classes.

Effective teaching requires good classroom management skills, engaging public speaking skills, and the use of evidence-based teaching strategies. All of this can be particularly daunting while teaching large-enrollment classes. In this episode, Bill Goffe, describes how his instructional approaches in large economic classes have evolved over time, in response to findings from cognitive science and educational research.

Bill Goffe is a Senior Lecturer in Economics at Penn State and a former colleague at the State University of New York at Oswego.  Bill is very well known in the profession for his Resources for Economists on the Internet, which was one of the very first internet guides available for economists (and is now hosted and sponsored by the American Economic Association). He is the Secretary-Treasurer for the Society of Computational Economics , an Associate Editor for Computational Economics and the online section of the Journal of Economic Education. He's also an editorial board member for Netnomics.  

A transcript and show notes are available at teaforteaching.com

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