Tea for Teaching

Informal discussions of effective practices in teaching and learning.

Active Learning: 6 Feet of Separation

During the fall 2020 semester, many faculty will be working in a classroom environment in which they will be in a classroom using a video conferencing tool to work simultaneously with a mix of remote students online and masked and physically distanced face-to-face students. There are significant challenges in using active learning techniques in this environment. In this episode, Dr. Derek Bruff joins us to explore some active learning strategies that may work under these very unusual circumstances. 

Derek is the Director of the Vanderbilt University Center for Teaching and a Principal Senior Lecturer in the Vanderbilt Department of Mathematics. He is the author of Teaching with Classroom Response Systems: Creating Active Learning Environments, as well as his most recent book on Intentional Tech: Principles to Guide the Use of Educational Technology in College Teaching. Derek is also a host of the Leading Lines podcast.

A transcript of this episode and show notes may be found at http://teaforteaching.com.

 

Active Learning

Moving from a familiar instructional format such as lectures to a more active learning environment can be daunting. In this episode, Dr. Patricia Gregg joins us to discuss how she flipped her classes and embraced active learning. Trish is an Assistant Professor of Geophysics at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

A transcript of this episode and show notes may be found at http://teaforteaching.com.

 

 

 

Small-Group Discussions

Small-group discussion activities provide all students, even the quiet ones, with an opportunity to actively engage with course material. In this episode, Dr. Dakin Burdick joins us to explore a variety of small-group discussion activities that can be productively integrated into our classes. Dakin is the Director of the Institute for College Teaching at SUNY Cortland. He has been active in professional development for almost 20 years, and has served on the Board of Directors for both the Professional and Organizational Development Network in higher education (the POD network) and the New England Faculty Development Consortium, where he was a president for four years.

A transcript of this episode and show notes may be found at http://teaforteaching.com.

Small Teaching Online

Face-to-face classes have been offered for centuries. Online instruction, though, is relatively recent and many faculty that teach online have little prior experience or training in online instruction. In today’s episode, Flower Darby joins us to explore some easy-to-implement teaching techniques that can be used to help improve the learning experiences of our online students.

Flower is the co-author (with James Lang) of Small Teaching Online. She is also an Instructional Designer and an Adjunct Instructor in several disciplines at Northern Arizona University.

A transcript of this episode and show notes may be found at http://teaforteaching.com.

Inclusive teaching

Are your class conversations dominated by a small number of voices? In this episode, Dr. Danica Savonick joins us to discuss a variety of class activities that support an inclusive learning environment and promote equity in participation while increasing student learning. Danica is an Assistant Professor of Multi-Ethnic Literature at SUNY Cortland, and a recipient of the K. Patricia Cross Future Leaders award, a Woodrow Wilson Fellowship in Women's Studies, and a Mellon/ACLS Dissertation Completion Fellowship.

A transcript of this episode and show notes may be found at http://teaforteaching.com.

 

 

 

Evidence-based teaching in large classes.

Effective teaching requires good classroom management skills, engaging public speaking skills, and the use of evidence-based teaching strategies. All of this can be particularly daunting while teaching large-enrollment classes. In this episode, Bill Goffe, describes how his instructional approaches in large economic classes have evolved over time, in response to findings from cognitive science and educational research.

Bill Goffe is a Senior Lecturer in Economics at Penn State and a former colleague at the State University of New York at Oswego.  Bill is very well known in the profession for his Resources for Economists on the Internet, which was one of the very first internet guides available for economists (and is now hosted and sponsored by the American Economic Association). He is the Secretary-Treasurer for the Society of Computational Economics , an Associate Editor for Computational Economics and the online section of the Journal of Economic Education. He's also an editorial board member for Netnomics.  

A transcript and show notes are available at teaforteaching.com

-

Play this podcast on Podbean App